Barthle Family

“Being a rancher means being a steward of the land and a steward of the cattle.” - Randy Barthle

Barthle Brothers Ranch

Dade City, FL

Cow/Calf Ranch

Cows are bred and calves are born and raised every year on cow-calf farms and ranches, spending time grazing on grass pastures within sight of their mothers.

Learn More >

Do no harm. That’s how the Barthle Brothers Ranch has operated since its inception in the 1920’s and how it still operates today. Third generation owners, Larry, Randy and Mark Barthle, strive to raise cattle while preserving the native grasslands and wildlife of Florida. The 8,000-acre cattle ranch includes a wildlife sanctuary, natural pastures, and protected species. These components all live with one another, offering a viable and sustainable ranch for today and the generations to come.

Check out the video below and read more about Barthle Brothers Ranch.

Facts At A Glance:

1920s

Barthle Ranch was Established

3rd

Generation Rancher

535

acres are licensed hunting preserve

8,000

acre ranch, half on native lands

2001

regional environmental stewardship award Program (ESAP) winner


“One thing I like about the Brahmans is their gentleness, they’re bug resistant, heat resistant, and very friendly.” - Larry Barthle



“When I go through the ranch and I see the cattle our on the range, existing with the natural environment and all of the natural species that are there, it’s proof number one that it is a viable business that can be conducted in a natural environment that isn’t detrimental to it.” - Mark Barthle


“We check the grass for pests, and track it all with an app called ‘The Pest Manager App’ to ensure that the native grasslands remain healthy. Keeping an eye on the health of the pastures means a healthier environment for our cattle and the wild species that live here.” - Chris Barthle


Meet Your Rancher:

Tell us about the history of your ranch.

Randy Barthle (RB) “Our grandfather was raising cattle in Florida on open range in the 1920’s. In the 1930’s, he purchased close to 20,000 acres. Over half of the land we have is still native land.”

What is one thing that you wish people knew about you and your ranch?

RB “It’s a generational thing and I’m the third generation. I can remember working with my grandfather when I was little. I’ve worked with my dad, I’ve worked with brothers and sisters. And now I’m working with my children and nieces and nephews.”

What does being a steward of the land mean to you?

Mark Barthle (MB) “As far as being stewards of the land, I’ve always summed it up with a simple phrase, the same as a doctor, ‘Do no harm.’ We preserve natural species because that’s beneficial to us. We have armadillos, gopher tortoises, white tail deer, cattle egrets and we have sandhills cranes, which in Florida are a protected species. Our cattle all coexist with them.”

Have you ever won an award or been recognized for your work on the ranch?

MB “I believe it was in 2001 when we were awarded National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Region II Environmental Stewardship Award. That was one of the highest points in my life because that was evidence we’re doing what we say we’re doing.”

What other ways do you incorporate sustainability on your ranch?

MB “We have a custom-built smoker made from recycled parts of the ranch. The main component was an old gas tank that sat in the sun for 5 years so the gas had volatilized off, the axle was salvaged from a cattle trailer from which I had changed the axles and the hitch was made from a scrapped round bale hauler. Take those items, a few more materials and a couple of weeks of evening and night work and voila you have a cooker. We’ve used this cooker and a friend’s Brisket recipe to win the 2014 People’s Choice Award at the Florida Heritage Festival.”

If you could ask consumers to “rethink” what they believe about beef and ranching– what’s the one thing you’d want them to know?

Larry Barthle (LB) “If we don’t take care of our cattle, they’re not going to take care of us. It takes a lot of time and dedication to raise a good herd of cattle. Every day we’re working hard to deliver the highest-quality, most wholesome beef for you and your families to enjoy.”

What does being a rancher mean to you?

LB “Being a rancher means family tradition.”
MB “Being a rancher means I get to do every day what other people get to do on the weekends.”
RB “Being a rancher means being a steward of the land and a steward of the cattle.”