Broiling Basics

With just a pinch of seasoning and one strong heat element in your oven, broiling is the sure-fire way to impress your family with a delicious meal in just a matter of minutes.

Broiling Basics

Broiling is similar to grilling in that it uses direct dry heat—only the heat comes from above instead of below. You’ll have the best results with cuts that are relatively flat and of even thickness. Check out our cooking chart for more recommendations and guidelines.

PREHEAT & PREP

Pull your steak from the fridge and season generously, per your recipe. Then turn on the broiler (we recommend reviewing the owner’s manual for your oven if you have any questions about how this function works). It’s best to use a broiler pan for even cooking and to catch drippings. Keep a timer handy. 

UNDER THE BROILER

Broiling works best if the meat is close to the broiler, about 2–4 inches. Start the timer when you slide the steak under the broiler. Depending on your oven, you may need to keep the door open slightly. Follow the timing in your recipe or our cooking chart, flipping the beef once halfway through.

ARE WE DONE YET?

A couple minutes before you reach the recommended time, quickly check your steak for doneness. An instant-read thermometer is your best bet. Keep in mind the internal temperature of your steak will continue to rise for a few minutes after pulling it out of the oven.

GIVE IT A REST

Even though it's going to look delicious (and you're probably getting hungry), be sure to let the steak rest for at least five minutes before cutting into it. Set it on a serving plate and cover it loosely with aluminum foil. This step is essential because it helps keep your steak juicy, rather than having all those juices drain out onto your plate.

FINISHING TOUCHES

Be sure to slice your steak across the grain—that is, most steak cuts are longer than they are wide, so slice across the narrow part of the steak. Then top your broiled steak with a bit of compound butter or serve with your favorite sauce

Cooking Tip

Turn beef with tongs. Using tongs instead of a meat fork avoids losing tasty juices when turning your meat.

Glossary

The Maillard Reaction

Ever wonder why that dark crust on a steak makes it taste so good? It's because of the Maillard (pronounced "my-yard") reaction, which happens when high heat transforms amino acids and sugars on the surface of the meat.

This steak is rich, juicy and full-flavored with generous marbling throughout. Sold bone-in. Due to the exceptional taste and tenderness Beef Rib Steaks deliver for operators and diners alike. Bone In Rib Steaks offer great plate coverage and impressive presentations.

A low-cost alternative to the Rib Eye Steak. A tender and savory cut great for grilling.

This lean, economical cut comes from the outside of the rear leg. It's generally best when braised, but can be roasted and sliced thinly against the grain. Bottom Round steak cuts should be marinated before grilling or broiling.

A relatively inexpensive cut with loads of beef flavor. Marinate before grilling.

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